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Welcome to the Champions Club Summer 2018!


Entries in coach glassman (37)

Dumb CrossFit Propaganda from Glassman

In this episode of Dumb CrossFit Propaganda from Coach Glassman, he has the audacity to say that CrossFit is more than just the Games or sub 3-minute Frans, but the bigger picture is showing that it's saving lives, keeping people out of the hospital and doctor's office, exposing corruption, and helping develop a permanent healthy lifestyle by employing a few very simple rules:

1. Eat meats and vegetables, nuts and seeds, some fruit, little starch, no sugar, then perform constantly varied functional movement at a high intensity.

2. Focus on doing this for one person at a time as best as humanly possible.

3. Keep the parties with conflicted interests out of the health space

And he swears too. What a jerk!

Quote of the Week vol. 233: Coach's Perspective

"The Games is the least important thing that happens in CrossFit. There is nothing less important than The Games. Nothing. The Games is the cotton candy and the clown at the car dealership; it's a distraction for the kids."

- Coach Glassman on Julie Foucher's podcast

There are a lot of Coach Glassman haters in the fitness community, some of them even within the Champions Club. I don't know him personally, but I have really never understood any of it. Just simply taking the time to listen to him speak - in length, not in snippets - should illustrate he's one of the best minds of our generation. We're very lucky to have him on our side.

Highlights from the interview:

  • Intro - a discount code for MWOD
  • 8:00 - doctor's only Level-1 seminar, doctors take the Level-1 for free, good business allows for him to be generous.
  • 18:30 - shaking the CrossFit Games image
  • 23:00 losing ESPN "thank God" and going with CBS, moving away from Carson, CA to Madison, WI, and how he would like to change the Games
  • 28:00 - trusting what you studied vs. trusting what you are seeing
  • 30:00 - "you take your carbs away and your Type-2 Diabetes will leave you"
  • 32:00 - brief summary of the corruption of the NSCA and other large health organizations (crazy stuff!)
  • 35:30 - CrossFit people that are currently running for congress in Washington DC
  • 40:00 - CrossFit being a health company, not just a fitness company. "what's happening after the doors are opened and lights turned on is life-saving"
  • 45:00 - what's changed at CrossFit HQ

Coach Glassman's Message to the Doctors

Sometimes it's good for us to zoom out from the feet together, unweighting, and arches in the feet and see the big picture of what CrossFit is doing for health as a whole.

Coach Glassman presented recently at a doctor's-only Level-1 Seminar in California about the topic of Big Food companies on the medical and health systems. It's a good summary of some of the longer lectures that have been released. Check it out.

"I get the feeling that they're leaving." This would be good for everyone if it came to fruition.

CrossFit Cures Chronic Disease

"We sit collectively (CrossFit trainers) in unique possession of an elegant solution to the world's most vexing problem. And it may be so elegant that it's optimal" That is Coach Glassman's intro at a Level 1 seminar in California. What is this problem, you ask? That would be chronic disease.

CrossFit may turn out to give people a pass on cancer, diabetes, heart disease, Alzheimer's, and just about every other chronic disease we know of.

This is a bold statement; I am proudly in the worship-Glassman group, and I was still skeptical when I first heard this somewhere around a year ago. But man, the stuff coming out is pretty convincing. Of course, I would expect the same knee-jerk reaction I had: there's no way that's a legit claim. And I'm not asking you to watch one video I post and be convinced.

But watch this video. [note, it's Coach Glassman. Course language, obviously]

"All of it is preventable. Much of it is reversable."

Quote of the Week vol. 207

"I don't know of an adaptation to nutrition that is unique to nutrition. I don't know of a positive adaptation to exercise that isn't also a feature of eating right. I can get you to eat right and make all this good stuff happen; you can eat wrong and I can introduce exercise into your life and make all this good stuff still happen. Together it's a tremendous force."

- Coach Glassman

Couch + CrossFit - Nutrition = CarterMy hope is to be steadily emphasizing the health/lifestyle improvements that come through the CrossFit program more than in the past. We have a lot of good athletes here who are good in spite of their lifestyle. Let's see if we can slowly bridge the gap.

Case Study: The Z-axis

I, Chris Sinagoga, can deadlift and squat more weight than Jacob at this time. And if I overheard correctly, Carter the Blob can deadlift more than Jack Trastevere. If that isn't an attention-getter, then I don't know what is.

...........

In the days before Summer 2012 was going to begin, Ryan Richard and I went out to Hyperfit USA (the Playboy Mansion of Michigan CrossFit gyms) to buy some equipment - the silver bars, the white rope, black box, and the black mats, to name a few. One of the coaches asked Ryan about some of his workouts and seemed genuinely impressed with the numbers. But he did say one thing in specific that I still remember:

"The thing you need to focus on now is not necessarily hitting a pr every time, but keeping everything within a certain range."

This also falls in line with Matt Fecht's former Quote of the Week about what would happen if people pr'd every time. And it also is parallel with the Pass it On post from December. And probably a ton of other things that has been up here on the site. But on a bigger scale, this was formalized on February 1, 2009 in the CrossFit Journal. Up until this point, Coach Glassman made waves in the exercise community by putting a scientific definition of fitness out for the world to test. But he realized that this formula - work capacity measured across broad time and modal domains - was limited. So he added a Z-axis to his graph that would account for longevity.

Graph of fitnessGraph of health

If fitness was defined as "work capacity across broad time and modal domains" then health could be defined as "fitness through the years."

In other words, your health and fitness is not determined so much by peaks and valleys as it is by consistency as you age. Whenever I get the chance to talk to other CrossFitters and coaches, this is the one thing I try to emphasize most because I think this is our specialty at the Champions Club. If your attendance is consistent, you can bet you will be in a steady-climbing constant ready-state for the next 10 years, and theoretically beyond that. That is a bold statement and avoiding pitfalls takes efficient coaching on my part, tons of patience on your part, and great communication from both sides.

...........

Elizabeth Banet had a Summer 2015 for the record books that resulted in a banner. She beat out a group of 5 athletes at their peak during the best Summer the Champions Club has ever witnessed. She was not a human being, plain and simple. And with all that being said, I am even more impressed with what she has done this Summer.

Biff made one good decision on Monday, April 24 to come in to the 6:30 session after a few months of hit-and-miss attendance; she stayed within the restrictions of what her fitness was at that time. Then made another good decision the next day. And then one more the next day. And she kept making good, daily decisions; all of a sudden I looked up in July thinking, "dang...this might be the fittest Elizabeth has ever been!" The same story can be said for her sister, Jacqueline. During the early winter, Jackie caught a bout of Mono; not only was she out of it for a few weeks, but she never could quite get that consistency back even when she was healthy. That is, until she did. And now she beats Elizabeth in most workouts.

Similarly, Summer 2016 Nicole Murley is probably the best female "CrossFiter" to ever call the Champions Club their home. I'm sure there is some level of bias, obviously, but when I think about the all-around demands of CrossFit workouts, you really can't say she's outside of the top 7 in anything, scaled or unscaled. She was not as fast as Shannon, not as strong as Shakes, not as flexible as Elizabeth, but her all-around ability was Mario with a Star in Mario Super Sluggers for the Nintendo Wii. In fact, Murley was on pace to challenge Shakes for the banner when she got a phone call about a Chemistry teaching vacancy at Riverview Gabriel Richard. Despite it being a year earlier than anticipated, she had to take it. As a result, her CrossFit ability decreased. But how much exactly? Here's her Filthy Fifty times over the years:

January 15, 2012 - 26:50 as rx'd pr

August 4, 2012 - 24:08 as rx'd pr

January 13, 2013 - 23:37 as rx'd (minus box jumps - 20 in. box) pr

August 13, 2013 - 18:55 (16k/14#/45)

August 16, 2014 - 18:53 guys rx'd

Last Friday - 18:38 guys rx'd (minus 14 med ball/20 box)

Judging by just her times, I would definitely look at Friday as anywhere from a win to a major win. Assuming she would have done a 2016 Filthy Fifty in around 18:00 with guys rx'd, this is not too far off. For her to be in the 17-minute range at this exact time, she would need to not be a teacher, have another year of Cross Country eligibility, and be generally interested in doing CrossFit on a regular basis. None of those conditions were realistic on August 18, 2017, so with that being said, she was at-worse 2 minutes slower than her peak self. Again, I would take that as a win. And if you look at it from another perspective:

Filthy Fifty times for other teachers: DNF/TL;DR

...........

I actually don't know for sure that I can deadlift more than Jacob at this exact moment in time; my max is probably in the high(ish) 300's, so if he can do that with a herniated disk then so be it. But either way, I am going to let MS Paint illustrate how I see it:

In this theoretical world with Jacob and I starting CrossFit at exactly the same point in fitness and time, he has a couple options: 1. deadlift as much as possible as soon as possible and live with the results or 2. accept his limitations (mobility, midline strength, coordination, arm length), and take a slower approach to his lift - which should turn out much better in the long run. In other words: prioritize the Z-axis, or don't.

I did a post about framing while running a while ago - essentially the more compact you keep the frame, the better your running will be. Same can be said for your fitness. In my opinion, the Pretend Jacob model would be better than the Jacob model despite taking much longer to hit the mutual maximum weight because there is less down time. Now, if he was competing in a weightlifting meet, or just wanted to be as strong as possible right now, I cannot argue against that. My opinion would just be that it is smarter to go the long-term route. Ideally you want to be in a position where you can, at any point in time, say, "I can come pretty close to my best right now", and there is too much time "under the curve" for my liking. In the grand scheme of things, the weight difference on the plus side only matters if you value your deadlift number over everything else. Again, I can only speak on what I think is best to value, but to each their own. I just know I would be embarassed if, for example, one of my track kids asked me to sprint a 400 with them and I had to decline because I wore out my knees overtraining for a marathon.

The longevity expression of CrossFit is an area that I rarely compromise on; sometimes Matt Fecht has to be ready for a race in a month, or Big Kris needs to be able to run 5 miles before going off to Air Force, etc. But this realization of the Z-axis in our fitness, coupled with the idea of having a "constant ready-state" are both integral in our training. And this is precisely why I am so impressed with Murley's Filthy Fifty time, and Elizabeth/Jacqueline's overall Summer. Whatever their training was leading up to these events provided a solid base that made it really, really difficult to fall completely off the cliff. They each made small, smart decisions on a daily basis to help their long-term health and now they could reasonably say they have a chance to pr for anything that comes up (with the exception of Murley's Cross Country race, obviously). Going forward they might get greedy and see if they can eclipse their prime, or they might get greedy in a different way: prioritize other things in their life and see how little they can manage to deviate away. And it might be a different answer depending on what time of year it is. Whichever they choose, you can bet they will be somewhere in the ballpark of fitter than most of the girls they will ever meet, whenever they meet them, in 20 minutes or 20 years from now.

And if they are really lucky, they'll be Mrs. Carey, who is coming up on 8 years into CrossFit and still on the steady climb up.

Programming Philosophy with Ben Bergeron + Today's Session Times

Session times for today (Wednesday) are:

9 am

11 am

5:30pm

It is a mobility day, but you will most likely also be able to make up a workout you missed if you want. This will probably not be the permanent Wednesday times, just a heads up.


Cap'n Jack linked a really good video to Crystal's Athlete of the Spring post that is one of the most elegant summaries of how I view CrossFit programming.

Ben Bergeron is a longtime CrossFitter and owner of CrossFit New England. His gym may be the most well-regarded in the CrossFit community, and he covered his thought process for designing workouts for his regular CrossFit crowd.

Notes:

  • Strength-biased programming (max effort lift before a regular workout in a session) started with an article by our own mentor, Jeff Martin, from Brand X Kids.
  • Goals of this, as stated in the article, was to help athletes gain the necessary strength to complete main site workouts as rx'd.
  • This has worked in the past, and was something he did for 4 years.
  • CrossFit Games numbers have encouraged this bias - especially starting in 2008.
  • "The problem with that is that our goal is not to have athletes do workouts as rx'd."
  • Over the course of time, he has seen the double-session (heavy lift coupled with met-con) burn people out. And he wasn't able to coach people as well as he wanted.
  • Understanding the difference between doing CrossFit competitively and doing CrossFit as a general strength and conditioning program is crucial. He wants his general athletes to be good 8 years from now. He wants his games athletes to be good by August 1. That short time-frame alters the program.
  • First, second, and third wave adaptations explanations. This relates to our Avoiding Dead End posts.
  • If he had to choose either strength or conditioning, he would choose conditioning. He still loves strength though.
  • Now he does a double-session once every ten days or so instead of almost every day.